It May Well Be Wrong.

The Online Gene Test Finds a Dangerous Mutation.

By Gina Kolata

Dr. Joshua Clayton, a 29-year-old radiology resident at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, wanted to learn about his ancestry. So he sent a sample of his saliva to 23andMe, the genetic testing company.

His report was pretty mundane — no new revelations. But then he sent the profile created by 23andMe to a separate company called Promethease, which promises to do a more in-depth analysis for genetic mutations that cause disease. Cont

My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me

A little over a year ago, my wife, Amy Krouse Rosenthal, published a Modern Love essay called “You May Want to Marry My Husband.” At 51, Amy was dying from ovarian cancer. She wrote her essay in the form of a personal ad. It was more like a love letter to me.

Those words would be the final ones Amy published. She died 10 days later.

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THE PRISONERS WHO CARE FOR THE DYING AND GET ANOTHER CHANCE AT LIFE

Inked in tattoos from neck to knuckle, Kevion Lyman rose from his bunk at dawn, pulled scrubs over his skinny frame, stepped out of his cell and set out for work. The 27-year-old strolled down the long central hallway connecting the different wings of the prison, past the dining hall, the solitary-confinement unit for violent offenders and the psych ward. Pushing open the big steel doors, he reported for his morning shift in the hospice. Cont

The Best Medicine?

By Mikkael A. Sekeres, M.D. May 3, 2018

What’s Meaningful to Our Patients

At the age of 28, my patient was already a war-weary veteran of leukemia.

When his cancer was diagnosed, we treated him with a multi-drug cocktail of chemotherapy over months, first with more intensive regimens that sidelined him from being able to work, and then with milder medicines.

His leukemia came raging back, though, so we treated him again, this time with one of the new, expensive immunotherapies that has been approved recently by the Food and Drug Administration. These are not curative, but in his case eliminated enough of the leukemia to enable him to receive a bone-marrow transplant, which did have the potential of curing him. cont

Creative Resilience

By Nicolette Asselin, M.D.

In an age in which terrorism, natural disasters, illnesses, shootings, and wide-scale industrial errors and accidents are occurring with increasing frequency, there is a tremendous need to develop ways to cope with the aftershocks. Post-traumatic illnesses are on the rise, and we need to find new ways to curtail and prevent their rise. Building resilience has become an important topic. In this story, I tried to illustrate the ways our family dealt with a personal tragedy.  Cont

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“Suleika’s Shield”,  by Anne Francey

 

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