Global Health

A column by Donald G. McNeil Jr. about global health news.

Bill and Melinda Gates Grade the World’s Health

Bill and Melinda Gates handed the world a report card last week, assessing its progress on 18 global health indicators: infant mortality, AIDS, vaccine use, smoking rates and so on.

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Lasting Merit Found in a Tuberculosis Vaccine Invented a Century Ago

Tuberculosis kills almost two million people a year. A perfect vaccine could save many of them, but the one now in use — invented in the 1920s and known as BCG, for Bacillus Calmette-Guérin — has so many flaws that some countries, including the United States, have never adopted it.

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The Silent Tragedy

The Silent Tragedy Affecting Today’s Children

by Victoria Prooday

1495902235671There is a silent tragedy developing right now, in our homes, and it concerns our most precious jewels – our children. Through my work with hundreds of children and families as an occupational therapist, I have witnessed this tragedy unfolding right in front of my eyes. Our children are in a devastating emotional state! Talk to teachers and professionals who have been working in the field for the last 15 years. You will hear concerns similar to mine. Moreover, in the past 15 years, researchers have been releasing alarming statistics on a sharp and steady increase in kids’ mental illness, which is now reaching epidemic proportions:

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The Wrong Way to Keep Kids Safe From Predators

Opinion | The New York Times

They need more than protection; they need the chance to develop survival skills. 

My heart is racing as he kisses my cheek. “Bye, Mom,” he says. Then he grabs his backpack and walks away. I want to snatch him back. I’ll settle for puking instead.

It’s the summer of 2015, and my baby is going off to camp. It’s 3,000 miles away. It’s his first time flying on a plane by himself. 

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Quick and Easy Workouts

By Tara Parker-Pope

Think you’re too busy to work out? We have the workout for you. In minutes, high-intensity interval training (H.I.I.T.) will have you sweating, breathing hard and maximizing the health benefits of exercise without the time commitment. Best of all, it’s scientifically proven to work. Cont

What Is H.I.I.T.?

SHORT WORKOUTS 101 by Jane Brody

High-intensity interval training — referred to as H.I.I.T. — is based on the idea that short bursts of strenuous exercise can have a big impact on the body. If moderate exercise — like a 20-minute jog — is good for your heart, lungs and metabolism, H.I.I.T. packs the benefits of that workout and more into a few minutes. It may sound too good to be true, but learning this exercise technique and adapting it to your life can mean saving hours at the gym. If you think you don’t have time to exercise, H.I.I.T. may be the workout for you. Cont

Benefits of Affordable Care Act

Researchers say there has been a substantial increase in women under the age of 26 who have received a diagnosis of early-stage cervical cancer since the health law came into effect in 2010. Cont

 

 

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Nanoparticles and more…

Nanoparticle Delivery Approach Targets Atherosclerotic Plaques

Tracy Hampton, PhD
JAMA. 2015;313(13):1305. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.2440.
s_jla150008faA promising new strategy against atherosclerosis uses nanoparticles to deliver a peptide fragment of annexin A1 (Ac2-26), a glucocorticoid-regulated protein that helps resolve inflammation, to arterial plaques (Fredman G et al. Sci Transl Med. 2015;7[275]:275ra20). The nanoparticles loaded with Ac2-26 are coated with peptides that target atherosclerotic lesions by binding to type IV collagen, a component of the basement membrane that becomes exposed at sites of vascular injury. Cont

What is Whipple Disease

Whipple’s was first identified in 1907 by Dr. George Whipple, who was caring for a fellow physician who had “gradual loss of weight and strength, stools consisting chiefly of neutral fat and fatty acids, indefinite abdominal signs, and a peculiar multiple arthritis.” The patient eventually died. Dr. Whipple suspected an infectious cause because he found bacteria in many of the patient’s affected tissues, but the organism itself wasn’t identified for nearly 80 years.

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