The Science behind Taste Buds

by Nicolette Francey Asselin

The ability to taste food is a vital part of our lives.

While some studies differ on this point and claim that it is inherited, the ultimate sense of taste is learned and developed at an early age. Early exposure strongly influences the components of flavors, detected by our sense of smell (olfactory system) and taste (gustatory system). Read

Mapping the Brain’s Genetic Landscape

Scientists have taken a step toward building a computer model of the brain’s genome, one that may help clarify the genetic roots of schizophrenia, autism and other disorders.

For the past two decades, scientists have been exploring the genetics of schizophrenia, autism and other brain disorders, looking for a path toward causation. If the biological roots of such ailments could be identified, treatments might follow, or at least tests that could reveal a person’s risk level.

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Is Alkaline Water Really Better for You?

Ask Well

ALICE CALLAHAN APRIL 27, 2018

Q. Are there benefits of drinking alkaline water, or is what I’m reading just a bunch of hooey?

A. Despite the claims, there’s no evidence that water marketed as alkaline is better for your health than tap water. Continue reading the main story

 

 

How People Learn to Become Resilient

BY MARIA KONNIKOVA (New Yorker)

Perception is key to resilience: Do you conceptualize an event as traumatic, or as a chance to learn and grow?

Norman Garmezy, a developmental psychologist, and clinician at the University of Minnesota met thousands of children in his four decades of research. But one boy, in particular, stuck with him.

Cont

Konnikova-Resilience-690

 

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Nanoparticles and more…

Nanoparticle Delivery Approach Targets Atherosclerotic Plaques

Tracy Hampton, PhD
JAMA. 2015;313(13):1305. doi:10.1001/jama.2015.2440.
s_jla150008faA promising new strategy against atherosclerosis uses nanoparticles to deliver a peptide fragment of annexin A1 (Ac2-26), a glucocorticoid-regulated protein that helps resolve inflammation, to arterial plaques (Fredman G et al. Sci Transl Med. 2015;7[275]:275ra20). The nanoparticles loaded with Ac2-26 are coated with peptides that target atherosclerotic lesions by binding to type IV collagen, a component of the basement membrane that becomes exposed at sites of vascular injury. Cont