It May Well Be Wrong.

The Online Gene Test Finds a Dangerous Mutation.

By Gina Kolata

Dr. Joshua Clayton, a 29-year-old radiology resident at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, wanted to learn about his ancestry. So he sent a sample of his saliva to 23andMe, the genetic testing company.

His report was pretty mundane — no new revelations. But then he sent the profile created by 23andMe to a separate company called Promethease, which promises to do a more in-depth analysis for genetic mutations that cause disease. Cont

Increasing Life Expectancy

By Jane Brody

Where’s the best place in America to live if you want to maximize your chances of living longer?

Based on an authoritative new state-by-state study of the American burden of disease, disability and premature death, and how it has changed from 1990 to 2016, you might consider setting down roots in Hawaii, where residents have the longest life expectancy 81.3 years.

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My Wife Said You May Want to Marry Me

A little over a year ago, my wife, Amy Krouse Rosenthal, published a Modern Love essay called “You May Want to Marry My Husband.” At 51, Amy was dying from ovarian cancer. She wrote her essay in the form of a personal ad. It was more like a love letter to me.

Those words would be the final ones Amy published. She died 10 days later.

Cont

Unplug

How to Have a Healthier Relationship with Your Phone

By CHARLOTTE LIEBERMAN

A few weeks ago, my sister and I went to our parents’ place for dinner. Over a glass of wine before the meal, cont

How Many People Can’t Tolerate Statins?

By Richard Klasco, M.D.

Medical researchers, normally a genteel lot, disagree sharply on the extent to which side effects from statin drugs are a problem.

Q. Are there studies concerning the number of people who cannot tolerate statins?

A. Yes. Studies show that about 5 percent to 10 percent of people are unable to tolerate statins, largely because of muscle aches and related side effects, including potential muscle damage. But… cont

If Fever Helps Fight Infection, Should I Avoid Fever-Reducing Drugs?

By Richard Klasco, M.D.

May 11, 2018

Q. If fever is the body’s way of fighting infection, should I avoid anti-fever medicines such as acetaminophen and ibuprofen?

A. The best evidence suggests that there is neither harm nor benefit to treating a fever with fever-reducing medications like acetaminophen or ibuprofen.

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THE PRISONERS WHO CARE FOR THE DYING AND GET ANOTHER CHANCE AT LIFE

Inked in tattoos from neck to knuckle, Kevion Lyman rose from his bunk at dawn, pulled scrubs over his skinny frame, stepped out of his cell and set out for work. The 27-year-old strolled down the long central hallway connecting the different wings of the prison, past the dining hall, the solitary-confinement unit for violent offenders and the psych ward. Pushing open the big steel doors, he reported for his morning shift in the hospice. Cont