What is Whipple Disease

Whipple’s was first identified in 1907 by Dr. George Whipple, who was caring for a fellow physician who had “gradual loss of weight and strength, stools consisting chiefly of neutral fat and fatty acids, indefinite abdominal signs, and a peculiar multiple arthritis.” The patient eventually died. Dr. Whipple suspected an infectious cause because he found bacteria in many of the patient’s affected tissues, but the organism itself wasn’t identified for nearly 80 years.

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Imagining A Future When The Doctor’s Office Is In Your Home

Extracting medical care from the health care system is all too often an expensive exercise in frustration. Dr. Eric Topol says your smartphone could make it cheaper, faster, better and safer.

That’s the gist of his new book, The Patient Will See You Now. Lots of people are bullish on the future of mobile health to transform health care, but Topol gets extra cred because of his major medical chops: Former head of cardiology at the Cleveland Clinic and present director of the Scripps Translations Science Institute in La Jolla, Calif.

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http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2015/01/12/376741693/imagining-a-future-when-the-doctors-office-is-in-your-home

Put on the Snow Shoes

Snowshoeing may provide a better workout than running or walking.

Question:
Can you get as good a workout with snowshoes as with running? If so, how?
Answer:
If by “good,” you mean a workout that leaves you sweat-soaked and panting, then snowshoeing may provide a better workout than running or walking. In one of the few studies to directly compare those activities, researchers in Vermont found that snowshoeing in powder at less than 3 miles per hour requires about the same exertion as jogging on level ground at more than twice that speed. more